A day in the life of an ‘Elite Athlete!’

LOVED my breakfast –  homemade smoothie with frozen strawberries, natural yoghurt, oats, honey, frozen banana, protein powder and a scoop of creatine. It took so long I don’t think I’ll make it through the traffic! My gym is in Canary Wharf and I need to get across town.

RitaOra

Not to worry! Put on my trusty Nike; bike across, work out with their anti gravity treadmill.  Consult with exercise medics, specialist physiothereapists  and their divine super conditioning coach.  He’ll love this look.

At Third Space I’ll unwind on their sprint tracks, and try out the aromatic juniper log glass saunas and hot yoga studios. Shall it be Tower Bridge, Soho, Marylebone?  Must check with Tony to see where we’ll meet for healthy low alcohol cocktails, later!

01-Rita-Oras-MTV-Studios-J_W_-Anderson-for-Topshop-Embroidered-Cotton-Shirt-and-Red-Tartan-Plaid-Pants1-277x500

Today I’m for complete total toning so I can escape to heaven in my JW Anderson collection! These Laboutins work best with toned legs and taut/toned core and don’t I know it!

All that effort for hours of controlled torture and lashings of Paparazzi!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gathering Moss…

A match made in Britain...
A match made in Britain…

A debate on Kate Moss stirs strange passions.  Young women either love or, a few conservative detractors, hate her.  British ‘Vogue’ in May is ecstatic over the continuing success of our British Fashion models, whether from the landed gentry or the street.

Moss, featured on the cover, is placed with other contemporary model successes and the long-running story of the Brits as a ‘punk nation!’

For Harrods and House of Fraser in 'Grazia'
For Harrods and House of Fraser in ‘Grazia’

Writer Chloe Fox says, “we’re constantly challenging notions of beauty. Kate Phelan, the stylist and ‘Vogue’ contributing editor believes, “Our cultural heritage is hugely influential. We constantly challenge the norm and the fashion industry wants to harness that spirit.”

Kate Moss has hit the zeitgeist over decades, a heroin waif in the eighties, the face of London in the 1990s, high street sensation Topshop, and currently for Kering’s wild boy, Alexander McQueen.

A Business of Fashion story which is really a best kept secret is how the international Fashion industry has come to rely on her neat body, outsider ID and perpendicular cheek bones.

She has been modelling for the rising Italian star Liu.Jo since 2011, from when its already stratospheric success has continued, doubling its number of employees worldwide each year.  With La Moss as their ‘face’ they sell across the classes, from city department stores and on-line, to Europe, the far and near East and Russia.

Celebrating the Italian Fashion show opening at the V&A, this week, Colin McDowell, making the important point that it’s really all about the fabrics and the clothes, puts Italian Fashion’s centuries long success down to its heritage and pride-in-making.

A curious anomaly could be that it’s a British teenage rebel performer who is now at the heart of its continuing fascino.

First published in ‘What Would Roland Barthes say?”

Gathering Moss…

Is the ‘Business of Fashion’ a Moss conservative detractor? The last time they mentioned her was in Sept 2013, saying she had returned to her ‘first extracurricular activity’ – her design liaison with ‘Topshop.’ So far no boost from BoF for her Spring 2014 launch.

What would Roland Barthes say?

For Harrods and House of Fraser in Grazia For Harrods and House of Fraser in Grazia

Match made in Britain Match made in Britain

A debate on Kate Moss stirs strange passions.  Young women either love or, a few conservative detractors, hate her.  British ‘Vogue’ in May is ecstatic over the continuing success of our British Fashion models, whether from the landed gentry or the street.

Moss, featured on the cover, is placed with other contemporary model successes and the long-running story of the Brits as a ‘punk nation!’

Writer Chloe Fox says, “we’re constantly challenging notions of beauty. Kate Phelan, the stylist and ‘Vogue’ contributing editor believes, “Our cultural heritage is hugely influential. We constantly challenge the norm and the fashion industry wants to harness that spirit.”

Kate Moss has hit the zeitgeist over decades, a heroin waif in the eighties, the face of London in the 1990s, high street sensation Topshop, and currently for Kering’s wild boy, Alexander McQueen.

A…

View original post 146 more words

‘Dolly Birds’ back in town

MARY Quant’s original ‘dolly birds’ are helping granddaughters  join the fascinating world of Fashion;  setting them up for careers in a business, which brings £22 billion, in direct sales, to the UK economy.

As well as ‘Queen of Frocks,’ Mary Portas,  C4, revitalising Fashion in department stores and on the high street, this inventive industry is seeing Fashion PR agencies growing, by two thirds in six months, and British Fashion Council chairman, Harold Tillman, backing the campaigns.

Grandmothers, who wore Mary Quant and who love Audrey Hepburn, are buying  ‘FASHION MEDIA PROMOTION  the new black magic’  for granddaughters setting off on Fashion courses.  It’s wonderful seeing Film and Fashion linking generations.

Each year, since the economic downturn, Fashion has fought back in high streets, on catwalks, in magazine editorials, on television, on-line, in window displays.  So when the going gets tough, the tough mobilise their forces, to sell more than just a few million, extra, new lipsticks.

With many Fashion students learning about the industry in colleges and universities, in Britain, there is room for optimism.

Above right:  Topshop New York

Waterstone’s, Deansgate, Manchester,  7pm, Thursday 27th October                                                                                                         Waterstone’s, Orchard Square , Sheffield, 5pm to 7pm, Thursday 17th November